Medical Terminology Daily (MTD) is a blog prepared by Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc. as a service to the medical community, medical students, and the medical industry. We will post a workweek daily medical or surgical term, its meaning and usage, as well as biographical notes on anatomists, surgeons, and researchers through the ages. Be warned that some of the images used depict human anatomical specimens.

You can follow "Medical Terminology Daily" via FacebookLinkedIn, or Twitter. Click on the form on the side column to subscribe to the Medical Terminology Daily (MTD) newsletter. Click here >> to let someone else know about this website. If you think an article could be interesting to somebody else, click on the mail icon (envelope) at the top or the article to forward it. We do not collect, share, or sell e-mails. You are most welcome to submit questions and suggestions using our "Contact Us" form, or directly via e-mail. The information on this blog follows the terms on our "Privacy and Security Statement"  and cannot be construed as medical guidance or taken as instructions for treatment. 


            "Like Us" on Facebook! "Like" or "Share" this page:   
 

We have 39 guests online


Don Antonio de Gimbernat i Arbós

Don Antonio de Gimbernat i Arbós
(1734-1816)  

Spanish anatomist and surgeon. His complete name was Don Manuel Luis Antonio de Gimbernat i Arbós. He was born to a farmer’s family in 1734 in Cambrils (Tarragona), in what today is Cataluña. Gimbernat studied Latin and Philosophy at the University of Cervera, continuing his studies at the School of Surgery in Cádiz, where he graduated in 1762.

Gimbernat joined the Spanish Navy, but because of this capabilities, in 1765 he was offered the position of Anatomy Professor at the Royal School of Surgery in Barcelona. In 1768 he made an anatomical discovery that would render him immortal: he demonstrated the presence of the lacunar ligament. Furthermore he applied his knowledge of this ligament to improve on the surgical technique to reduce a strangulated femoral hernia. Gimbernat also discovered the lymph node found in the femoral ring (later to be known as Cloquet’s or Rosenmueller’s node)

In 1774 Gimbernat traveled through Europe to learn the latest surgical techniques. This trip was sponsored by King Carlos III. During his stay in London Gimbernat studied with John Hunter (1728 – 1793). In an attitude not common for a student at the time, at the end of one of Hunter's anatomical lectures on hernia, Gimbernat asked to go to the cadaver and demostrate his findings. With approval of the teacher, he demonstrated for Hunter the lacunar ligament as well as his strangulated femoral hernia technique. Hunter watched the demonstration and at the end of it he just said "You are correct, sir".

Hunter was so impressed that from that day on he referred to the lacunar ligament as “Gimbernat’s ligament) and adopted his surgical technique. Gimbernat also showed Hunter his studies and technique to repair diaphragmatic hernias.

Manuel Gimbernat participated in the creation of the Spanish Royal School of Surgery, became a professor of surgery and  orthopedics, and in 1789 he was named First Royal Surgeon and president of all the surgical schools in Spain.

In 1793, Gimbernat published his “ Nuevo Método de Operar en la Hernia Crural” dedicated to King Charles IV,  which was translated as “A New Method of Operating for the Femoral Hernia”, into English in 1795.

All of his titles and positions were removed by King Fernando VII because Gimbernat was a supporter of Napoleon during his invasion of Spain in 1808.  Sick, poor, blind, and with ailing mental faculties, Don Manuel Gimbernat died in Madrid on November 17, 1816.

Gimbernat was also a pioneer in ophthalmology, vascular surgery and urology. As for his incredible anatomical dissection capabilities, Gimbernat often said “mi autor más favorito es el cadaver humano" (my favorite author is the human body”

Sources:
1. “Manuel Antonio de Gimbernat y Arbós. 1734-1816” Trauma (2012) 23: (1)
2. ” Gimbernat y Arbós, Antonio de (1734-1816) Loukas M et al World J Surg 2007; 31: 855-7
3. “Epónimos médicos: Ligamento de Gimbernat” Febrer JLF 1999
(Link) 
4. “Antonio de Gimbernat (1734- 1816). Anatomist and surgeon” Puig-LaCalle J, Martí-Pujol R. Arch Surg 1995; 130: 1017- 20
5. “Antonio de Gimbernat, 1734-1816” Matheson NM. Proc R Soc Med 1949; 42: 407-10.
6. "Antonio Gimbernat y Arbós: An Anatomist-surgeon of the Enlightenment (In the 220th Anniversary of his ‘‘A New Method of Operating the Crural Hernia’’) Arraez-Aybar LA, Bueno-Lopez JL. Clin Anat (2013) 26:800–809
 


Follow MTD:


 "Clinical Anatomy Associates, Inc., and the contributors of "Medical Terminology Daily" wish to thank all individuals who donate their bodies and tissues for the advancement of education and research”.  

Click here for more information


AbeBooks. Thousands of booksellers - millions of books.

Corona Mortis

Important for inguinal hernia anatomy and surgery, this term is Latin from [corona] meaning "crown' and [mortis] meaning "death'; the "crown or circle of death". The corona mortis (blue arrow) refers to an anatomical variation1, a vascular anastomosis between the obturator and the external iliac vascular systems that passes over Cooper's pectineal ligament and posterior to the lacunar (Gimbernat's) ligament. 

In some cases, the corona mortis is the actual obturator artery that arises from the inferior epigastric artery instead of the internal iliac artery. It can also arise from the external iliac artery. In both cases, it has been called an "aberrant obturator artery". This could be a misnomer, as this anatomical variation can be present in up to 25% of the cases. When present, the corona mortis  can be injured when a surgeon looks to enlarge the femoral ring by opening the lacunar ligament. This vascular structure could even be endangered in a laparoscopic procedure for inguinal of femoral hernia repair and a staple or tack is driven blindly into the pectineal (Cooper's) ligament.

Corona Mortis (A)Image property of: CAA.Inc.Artist: M. Zuptich

Berberoglu states that "although these tiny anastomoses... have been described in classical anatomy textbooks, these texts neglect to mention that theses anastomoses can be life-threatening".

In some rare cases, the corona mortis (aberrant obturator) artery coexists with the normal obturator artery.  Although called a [corona], this anatomical structure is an incomplete circle. In the image, the [corona mortis] is labeled "A".

Sources:
1. Rusu et al: "Anatomical considerations on the corona mortis" Surg Radiol Anat (2010) 32:17–24
2. Berberoglu et al: "An anatomic study in seven cadavers and an endoscopic study in 28 patients" Surg Endosc (2001) 15:72-75